Wednesday, April 21, 2021

Literacy – Spanning the US :: Tyler TX :: Lakeland FL :: New Bedford MA

Literacy In The News :: Spanning the US

@lcotyler

Literacy Council of Tyler Continues Mission To Improve Adult Literacy Amid COVID-19 Pandemic
Tyler Paper: 3.31.2021 by Raquel Torres

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected almost every aspect of life, including education and literacy.

@LiteracyTexas

Literacy Texas and Baylor University Diana R. Garland School of Social Work released survey results last week that identified barriers — lack of technology and education — created by COVID-19 impacting Texas nonprofit adult literacy providers and students.


Leaders of the
Literacy Council of Tyler participated in the survey. Though researchers determined that lack of access to technology is a major hurdle in literacy training, they identified a passionate and resilient community of professionals and volunteers committed to Texas’ adult literacy achievement.

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“Because of all the changes in the workforce, people are either out of work for the first time in a long time, or they might be underemployed, or something has changed within their job and they realize they need their GED, or they need to go a totally different direction,” Patterson said.

This is where she says the low-literacy adults would come to the surface, because they may have been in the same job for so long and perhaps literacy wasn’t crucial to their job.

“Sometimes they just go under the radar and nobody really knows that they struggle so much with reading and writing,” Patterson said.  READ MORE ➤➤

 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 14
Reading Level: difficult to read.
Reader's Age: 21-22 yrs. old
(college level)

 

Read Lakeland

Read Lakeland Looks To Improve Adult Literacy In The Community
Tampa FP: 3.31.2021 by Conner Johnston

Currently, it is estimated that 24% of adults living in Lakeland are functioning at the lowest level of literacy. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, this 3% higher than the national average of 21% in the U.S. Read Lakeland, a local non-profit organization that started in 1995, is working to combat illiteracy in Lakeland amidst COVID-19.

Read Lakeland was originally planning their 25-year anniversary along with their annual “Kiss the Pig” fundraiser in 2020 before the coronavirus pandemic forced the country to shut down. A year later, the organization is focusing on the future and how they will continue to help the community.

“A group of school teachers realized there was a need and that adults, not just children needed help,” said Beth Hesseltine, the Executive Director of Read Lakeland. “Getting a tutor for children is not a hard task but for someone over the age of 18 it can be hard to find someone who teaches an adult.”  READ MORE ➤➤

 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 10
Reading Level: fairly difficult to read.
Reader's Age: 14-15 yrs. old
(Ninth to Tenth graders)

 

New Bedford's Discovery Language Academy To Offer Free Adult English Language Program
Herald News: 4.01.2021 by Lurdes C. da Silva

The Discovery Language Academy will be offering a free Adult English Language Program (AELP) with Family Support for local immigrants to learn English thanks to a $6,000 grant received from the Polaroid Fund of the Community Foundation of Southeastern Massachusetts.

“The major goals of this program are to recruit 25 new AELP participants and provide nine months of intensive classroom instruction which is rigorous but enjoyable,” said Dr. Leslie Vicente, executive director of the Discovery Language Academy.

“By participating in immersive English class work, adult learners improve their language confidence and are better able to self-advocate and participate in the workplace, engage in civic events such as elections and contribute to and strengthen the fabric of the Southcoast,” added Dr. Vicente.  READ MORE ➤➤

 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 17
Reading Level: difficult to read.
Reader's Age: College graduate


Tuesday, April 20, 2021

2021 ProLiteracy Conference on Adult Literacy Awards ▬ May 3 Deadline

2021 ProLiteracy Conference on Adult Literacy Awards

ProLiteracy

Recognize those leading the way in adult literacy.

ProLiteracy

Nominate a worthy individual to have their work celebrated at the ProLiteracy Conference on Adult Literacy: San Antonio  September 20-22

Submit a Nomination
DEADLINE:  MAY 3

Nominate a worthy individual or program for one of the following:

Ruth J. Colvin and Frank C. Laubach Award for Excellence in Community-based Adult Literacy
Recognizes outstanding tutor, trainer, teacher, volunteer, or program administrator*

Ruth J. Colvin and Frank C. Laubach Award for Adult Learner Excellence
Recognizes an outstanding adult learner*

Award for Program Innovation and Collaboration
Recognizes accomplishments resulting from a collaboration between different types of organizations*

NEW!
Award for Distance Learning Excellence
Recognizes accomplishments resulting from a collaboration between different types of organizations*

Dollar General Student of the Year Award
Recognizes an outstanding adult learner*

READ MORE ➤➤

 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 15
Reading Level: very difficult to read.
Reader's Age: College graduate

 

Monday, April 19, 2021

Reader-friendly Non-fiction for Adults ▬ Decoda Literacy Solutions

Reader-friendly Non-fiction for Adults

@decodaliteracy
Decoda Literacy Solutions

Many adults who are practising their reading are interested in reader-friendly non-fiction. It is concrete, introduces useful vocabulary and can offer relevant information.

The Decoda Library has lots of reader-friendly non-fiction. Much of it is written for adults and some is written for children, but is not childish.

Here are some of the latest:

ANIMALS

Four new entries in the popular Amazing Animals series:

SCIENCE

WORDLESS NON-FICTION

This selection of Eye on Literacy wordless books does not include lesson plans. Other titles in this series in the library include ready-to-use lesson plans.

WORKPLACE

READ MORE ➤➤

 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 9
Reading Level: fairly difficult to read.
Reader's Age: 13-15 yrs. old
(Eighth and Ninth graders)


Sunday, April 18, 2021

Literacy – Spanning North America :: Saskatoon SK :: Muskegon MI :: Falls Church VA :: Menlo Park CA

Literacy In The News :: Spanning North America

@READSaskatoon

Sask. Author Honours Former READ Saskatoon Volunteer, Avid Reader Through Book Auction
Star Phoenix: 3.26.201 by Bre McAdam

At a jazz show in Saskatoon, you knew the act was good when front desk volunteer Jean Spurgeon put down her book to go listen.

She always had a book, whether she was volunteering, riding the bus or on a break at work, said her daughter, Bev Kowaluk.

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READ Saskatoon was close to Spurgeon’s heart. She was one of their first volunteers from 1980 until 1992, working out of the Frances Morrison library to help adults with reading and writing.

She received a Canada Literacy Volunteer Award in 1990, a certificate of appreciation from READ’s former director and a touching letter written about her, by one of her students, in 1992.

“One thing that mom had always commented on through the years is that she helped adults increase their reading and writing skills, increase their knowledge and their confidence,” Kowaluk said.  READ MORE ➤➤


Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 11
Reading Level: fairly difficult to read.
Reader's Age: 15-17 yrs. old
(Tenth to Eleventh graders)

 

@ReadMuskegon

Read Muskegon Giving Away Free Books To Remember Long-Time Board Member
WZZM 13: 3.26.2021 by Jon Mills

Read Muskegon is honoring the passing of a long-time board member by giving 250 books to some of Muskegon County youngest residents.

The books will be included in education bags the MAISD's Early On program delivers to families in Muskegon County with children between 0 and 3 years of age.

Read Muskegon says the effort fits the agency's mission to connect Muskegon County residents with services to improve literacy in individuals and in turn improve the literacy of the county as a whole.

The 250 copies of "Zoom, Zoom, Baby!" were purchased with memorial funds contributed to Read Muskegon in honor of long-time Read Muskegon board member Merle Scolnik who passed away in January at the age of 77.

Read Muskegon's Executive Director Mellissa Moore says Scolnik asked before her passing that any memorial donations in her name be sent to Read Muskegon.

The books are something the Early On program will get into the hands of parents and grandparents who will use reading to get their child or grandchild ready for school.  READ MORE ➤➤

 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 13
Reading Level: difficult to read.
Reader's Age: 18-19 yrs. old
(college level entry)

 

@LCNV

Literacy Council Of Northern Virginia Lets Supporters Walk In Shoes Of Clients
Inside Nova: 3.27.2021 by Scott McCaffrey

Imagine you parachute into the middle of Tokyo – a Tokyo where nobody speaks English and you speak nary a word of Japanese – and your primary goal is to find some way, any way, to understand enough to communicate with those around you.

That was the test of a number of volunteers taking part in “A Taste of Literacy,” part of a March 25 online fund-raising and public-awareness effort of the Literacy Council of Northern Virginia.

The initiative was a chance for participants to “have us walk in the shoes of English-language learners,” said Xavier Muñoz, associate director of teaching of learning for the non-profit social-safety-net organization.

Muñoz for 20 minutes led the volunteers – Ashley King, Wafa Misellati, Jeff DiMeglio, Ruba Afzal and Will Canas, among others – in a full-immersion, no-English-allowed, trial-and-error foray in Japanese.

“It’s very challenging,” Muñoz promised the participants, who gamely struggled in front of a Zoom audience.

And that was the point – to show the trials gone through by those who do not have English-language skills and have to learn from scratch using the services of the Literacy Council.  READ MORE ➤➤

 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 14
Reading Level: difficult to read.
Reader's Age: 21-22 yrs. old
(college level)

 


Mike Goodkind Heads New Non-Profit Literacy Partners – Menlo Park
In Menlo: 3.29.2021 by Linda Hubbard

Menlo Park resident Mike Goodkind says he’s always been interested in the “world of words.”

“I worked on my high school and college daily and then went into the Peace Corps as I thought that experience might be useful for a journalist,” he recalled.

He worked for the Associated Press in Los Angeles before embarking on a 20-year career as an editor, science communicator, and public relations specialist at Stanford Medical Center, retiring in 2002. Soon after, he learned about Project Read and did part-time work as a computer lab coordinator for Redwood City Project Read for four years.

@RwcRead

“I really enjoyed that and eventually took on a volunteer position at the Menlo Park Library’s Project Read program,” he said.

A turning point came in 2019 when a new library director took over “with lots of visionary ideas.”

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In May 2020, the organization adopted a new name, Literacy Partners – Menlo Park. “The name emphasizes both our community focus and our enduring commitment to literacy,” Mike wrote in a letter to donors. “We have revised our bylaws and mission statement to broaden our mission so that we can support other literacy programs besides Project Read. With our new mission and concurrent changes in our structure and bylaws, we will now have the opportunity to fund programs that will more broadly help family, childhood and youth literacy.  READ MORE ➤➤
 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 11
Reading Level: fairly difficult to read.
Reader's Age: 15-17 yrs. old

 

Saturday, April 17, 2021

College App Helping Address Adult Literacy ▬ City of Glasgow College

College App Helping Address Adult Literacy

Citizen Literacy APP

FE News: 4.16.2021 by City of Glasgow College UK

A new smartphone app which supports adult literacy learners has been launched in Apple and Googleapp stores.

The Citizen Literacy app has been developed by City of Glasgow College in partnership with leading literacy experts and software developers from across the UK. 

It has grown from the college’s successful City Phonics programme which offers a first step in literacy for the adult beginner learner.

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The app is specifically designed for low literacy users so traditional text-driven interfaces are not used. It uses voice and handwriting recognition technologies for learner input, and features virtual tutor voices who provide information and directions to learners. Adopted AI tools tune the app to an individual user’s local accent, making it more inclusive.  READ MORE ➤➤
 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 13
Reading Level: difficult to read.
Reader's Age: 18-19 yrs. old
(college level entry)


Friday, April 16, 2021

Why Health Literacy Matters and How Telehealth Can Help ▬ Health Recovery Solutions

Why Health Literacy Matters and How Telehealth Can Help

Health Literacy - CDC
Health Recovery Solutions: 2.11.2021 by Elena Muller, MPH

For public health professionals health literacy is one of the first things we learn about. Why? Because it cascades into and influences all areas of health. Per the CDC’s definition, personal health literacy is the “degree to which individuals have the ability to find, understand, and use information and services to inform health-related decisions and actions for themselves and others.”

Current data suggests that about one third of American adults, or 89 million people, have insufficient health literacy skills. They do not have the tools (often out of their control and due to a range of circumstances) to effectively seek and obtain the medical and preventive care they need, and are twice as likely to report poor health outcomes.

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How does health literacy impact patient outcomes?

A number of factors may influence an individual’s health literacy, including living in poverty, lack of education, race/ethnicity, age, substance abuse and other addictions, and disability. Important to note is that just because an individual has high overall literacy, doesn’t mean they have high health literacy—while often overall literacy facilitates higher health literacy, this is not always the case.

An individual’s health literacy impacts their ability to:

◆ Understand their care plan including symptom management, prescriptions, appointment cadence, etc.

 Communicate effectively with their providers

 Make informed decisions about and then receive treatment

 Know when a situation is emergent or not

 Navigate the healthcare system - insurance coverage, forms, locating the providers and specialists they need access to for quality and affordable care

 Understand preventative measures they can take to prevent illness

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How can telehealth help?

To fully understand how telehealth can help promote health literacy, let’s explore telehealth’s role in each area noted above:

 Care plan understanding including symptom management and prescription adherence

 Communicating effectively with providers

 Making informed decisions about treatment options

 Knowing when a situation is an emergency or not

 Navigating the healthcare system

 Understanding preventative measures

READ MORE ➤➤

 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 17
Reading Level: very difficult to read.
Reader's Age: College graduate


Thursday, April 15, 2021

The Clear Correlation Between Libraries And Literacy Rates ▬ Ebook Friendly

The Clear Correlation Between Libraries And Literacy Rates 

#BuildLibraries
Ebook Friendly: 3.08.2019 by Ola Kowalczyk

There are many reasons for illiteracy. One of them is having a library nearby at a young age.

The infographic that has just been revealed by Hachette Book Group proves that there is a clear correlation between the number of public libraries and the literacy rate.

Take a closer look at the map of the Unites States. Each state is defined by two icons. The yellow one reflects library density; the red one shows the share of illiterate population.

As you see, the more libraries there are in the state, the smaller the illiteracy rate. Three states with the highest library density – Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine – have also the lowest rate of adult population lacking basic literacy skills.  READ MORE ➤➤

 
Based on 7 readability formulas:
Grade Level: 10
Reading Level: fairly difficult to read.
Reader's Age: 14-15 yrs. old
(Ninth to Tenth graders)